Finding Film Data

We are in times of out dated film — film from unknown storage — film without datasheets. So, to the netfora with a question; like the camera counter of last century, except, these people are retired accountants, roofers, support staffers. Few of them worked as photographers; fewer still kept their old notebooks, those collections of datasheets. Firms like Kodak produced massive stacks of data in the form of how-to guides, along with instructional books — not even mentioning the many datasheets inserted into countless boxes of film/paper.

So, to the Loud Forums with a question:

Kodak Copy Film

The answer is quick, intended to assist, but does it? How much help? Go somewhere else; look in a booklet you don’t have. Oh, and the obscure developers are wrong, but not really, they’re just flailing answers. The answer is online; in two archive books. And now here:

Kodak 4125 Copy Fillm

The exotic developer is HC-110 (Dil E). This film was used indoors, I used it at tungsten settings, EI:12. It was also used as a lab film, in darkroom using enlarger light. Read the guidance about exposure and control of highlights. That is why it could be used in a masking system, and in duplicate negative making, although, I used dupe negative film for that: made it a one-step process.

So, I could pass this info on to the Loud Forumists; why don’t I? I don’t have a login. They are boring people trapped and trapping others, like some vast herd stuck in bogs.

readings … PPE

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