Another Getting Stuff

The camera center’s supply cabinet is the junk table of the internet. Finding good stuff among all the bad stuff means sifting, seemingly randomly, through what is presented. Naturally, the novice seeks answers from presumed experts – the foruatti. What makes them an expert? Their say-so.

What they say they know, and what they show they know are the significant elements of your risk.

Seeing in Colors

Because they don’t know what they’re talking about, they don’t see what they’re looking at.

A topic search about ‘tricolor’ turned up a discussion on a large forum. One of the posters remarked that they’d seen something interesting on ebay. They, nicely, posted a link which I followed. One of the high post pontificators pointed out that: “it is broken. Can’t work. I know because.” He didn’t know, but he deflected people. I suppose that he would rather be heard than to say something useful, or meaningful.

It doesn’t always work out. In this case it did. The box of goodies had come from a shop that did direct separations. The extras thrown in (because the seller wanted them gone) included filters, inspector guides, things from a working pre-press shop. Most of the things that anyone interested in making direct seps would need. Did the large forum braggart even look at the link? Did he even think?

In the picture on the left [‘two size tabs], we see what seems a typical 4×5 film holder. Except, when looking at it edge on, there is a ‘green’ edge, as well as a ‘silver’ back (instead of another slide). The other set of pictures show the elements of this ‘Green’ separation holder. The back slide discloses a platen, pressure-plate that holds the film toward, and against the separation filter (this one is green). You can also notice the notches for coding the separation negative. Those two ‘v’ cutouts would make 2 dark edge marks onto the film. After developing, you would see these on the edge of the film and know which separation this sheet was. Each color has a different notch code.

Direct seps are made with: 25, 58, 47 filters. These are inclusive enough to capture most of the colors of an outdoor scene. They’re available new from several manufacturers. 2020 prices range from $17 each, to $180 each. If you are still forming ideas, and gaining skills, go for the Lee’s (the lower price filters.)

Terms – refs

Direct separation; camera-separation; in-camera sep; tricolor — these are the same thing. None of them require us use RGB. Most of the examples you see will be those. If you are making dye transfer prints, these are assumed in the directions and example literature. BUT. they are not required. Any filter ‘separates’ — it is up to you to determine if there is meaning for you.

For further, very old, but worthwhile see this: 1916 Manual

Websites go offline – books are always offline. The book I’d suggest you reference is Spencer’s “Color Photography in Practice” [use “colour” to find more copies. ~ $4]

This is just a pencil, not a paint by number set.

If you do more, I’ll write more.

if someone’s principle is precision of procedure

then they should be able to provide clear, precise directions for that process.

further, they should be able to report the end point of their own research results — this would be their starting point, and could easily be provided to you as a starting point for your work.

all doable without bragging or fear based bias.

it should be easy to report what their filters, factors, exposures, developments are for their primary film system.

If they are also using this as an intermediate they should also be able to pass along the suceeding stages/steps..

why do they put so much effort into the reasons why not? what they tell you, they have told themself — maybe why they’ve not gotten far — perhaps they’re afraid you will get further faster than they did.

If they can/do tell you why not, why not tell you what and how they do it.

Reminder:

exposure balancing with neutral density filters rather than shutter and aperture.

2n15 will be at SPEnational – you could be shown the jigs and methods of calibrating exposure, development, color correction quite quickly, without the chest pounding and bragging about imagined accomplishments

2n15 Rule

if you can’t engage beyond technical you can’t get into OIC, or you are dropped

  • no more than 15minutes on process, technical
  • no more than 2 technical questions